I (perhaps reluctantly) supported the Government on Tuesday evening in bringing in the new Tier system, despite plenty of siren voices beseeching me not to do so. I am particularly concerned about pubs and hotels, many of which are facing a bleak winter. And when I was showing my new Private Secretary Jenny Fleischer round the patch on Thursday, I was surprised how many pubs had opted to stay shut, substantial meals or not.

My reasoning for supporting the Government was very straightforward.  According to the Secretary of State for Health’s latest Covid-19 Situation Report for the South West, the fact is that rates are rising quite sharply in rural Wiltshire. Purton, for example is (surprisingly) one of the worst hotspots in all of Wiltshire at least partly thanks to long term care homes in the area; while neighbouring regions such as South Gloucestershire and Bristol are in Tier Three – the highest level of restrictions. Both Swindon and Wiltshire hospitals are reporting increasing admissions. So I do fear that the restrictions even in very rural parts of Wiltshire really are necessary if we are to combat this virus and especially if we are to allow some slackening off over Christmas. I believe the Precautionary Principle applies here - if we act, we hope to avoid a likely disaster. If that disaster is imaginary, then we pay a price for it, but a lower price than we would pay if the predictions turned out to be true and we had not taken the appropriate actions. After all, if as a result of my vote hundreds of my constituents became infected, seriously ill or died, then I would not be able to look myself in the mirror.

What’s more, we have the vaccine to look forward to shortly, and I for one am very hopeful that life may well be starting to return to normal by about Easter. Pfizer and BioNTech's announcement that the vaccine they have been developing appears to be 90 per cent effective in preventing COVID-19 in participants was most welcome news. The Government is facing a massive logistical exercise in getting the vaccine out; and it will without a doubt take many months altogether. But it will be done, and we will be able to look back with thanks and gratitude to all of those who made it possible. In the words of the Royal Wootton Bassett motto, “We Honour Those Who Serve.”

I am especially concerned about the elderly, the sick, the bereaved or the lonely, who may well be facing a bleaker time than expected thanks to all of this. Our hearts go out to them and their families. All of the fuss which some people are making about what they can or cannot do with various branches of their families must be a bitter sound to those who have no families to fuss about. So, it may be a small thing, but if you happen to know of anyone who would feel a little better if they got a Christmas card from their local MP, then please do let me know with a name and address, and I will see what I can do. (I have quite a few left over from previous years which might be deserving of a good home.)

I will use any profit I might get from the sale of my new book, Wiltshire to Westminster - a collection of these columns stretching back all told to 1997 (but heavily edited I assure you) – to pay for the postage. So if you are kind enough to order one (and an early order will make delivery by Christmas possible), then you can also know that it is going to a good cause. Details are on my website, jamesgray.org.

Times are tough, and we are by no means through the worst yet. But the figures do seem to be levelling off, the Lockdown does indeed seem to have worked, and the early delivery of the vaccine, and its promised efficacy is something to look forward to. But we have to be strong until then and abide by the rules, difficult as it may be for all of us.  

It may not be the Christmas season we hoped for but let us help each other through it as best we can, and things will be looking brighter with the New Year.